Morristown Walk: Mansions from Gilded Age, Victorian Times, Revolutionary Era

sam. 1 décembre à 18:45

Fuseau horaire : Paris (GMT+01:00)

Staples in Morristown
Morristown
États-Unis
Morristown

This walk in Morristown, NJ is on scenic route filled with interesting places. I will occasionally make comments & stop at points of interest but you will have plenty of time to socialize with others. Cost: The cost of this event is $4 per person, which is paid at the start of the walk. This is for the organizer's Meetup preparation costs and fees.((Please read the "About Us Section" for more information regarding the $4 per person fee for each event.) Walk is 6 miles, moderate paced, mostly on sidewalks. Bring lunch, water, walking shoes, sun protection, EXTRA LAYERS OF CLOTHING. We'll have a late lunch at 2:00 PM in Frelinghuysen Arboretum. THERE IS NO NEED TO POST WHY YOU CAN'T MAKE THE EVENT. If you are registered for this walk and can't attend, please change your RSVP online from "YES" to "NO". (PLEASE READ THE "ABOUT US SECTION" FOR THE GUIDELINES ABOUT NO SHOW POLICY.) No young children, service animals or pets allowed on walk w/o prior approval of organizer. No smoking, please. If you have a personal matter/questions, please contact John, the Event Host, through his private Meetup account. Description We'll walk past historically significant houses/mansions (from Revolutionary War era to the early 1900s) in historic Morristown. By the early 1900s, more millionaires lived within a three-mile radius around Morristown than anywhere else in the U.S. & some of these opulent Gilded Age mansions have survived to today. Our first stop will be the 127-acre Frelinghuysen Arboretum, which has Colonial-Revival mansion, a carriage house (with a collection of 19th century carriages), staff cottage, gazebo, forest, & gardens. This property was owned by Matilda Frelinghuysen [masked]), who had an interest in gardening and was a member of the Garden Club of Morristown. In 1964, she began plans for turning the estate into an arboretum. Upon her death the land & house was bequeathed to the people of Morris County for the use as a public arboretum. Frelinghuysen Arboretum was dedicated in 1971. Frelinghuysen Arboretum has free admission & is open to the public until dusk (Sunset 4:29 PM). Afterwards, we'll stop in front of & briefly talk about Washington's Headquarters in Morristown National Historical Park. Morristown National Historical Park commemorates the sites of General Washington & the Continental army’s winter encampment of December 1779 to June 1780, where they survived through what would be the coldest winter on record. We'll also briefly talk about Acorn Hall, a lovely Italianate-style house, built in 1853. Acorn Hall was named for the red oak tree that once stood on its property. The house was built for the Schermerhorn family, and then purchased by Augustus and Mary Crane in 1860. It remained in the Crane-Hone family until 1971, when Mary Crane Hone gave Acorn Hall, its contents, & surrounding five acres to the Morris County Historical Society. At this point, there is an option for those who wish to walk around Morristown's Historic District, which has paved sidewalks & well-lit streets (sunset 4:29 PM) & is not far from train station. We'll walk past Villa Fontana (which was editorial cartoonist Thomas Nast's home), Vail Mansion (Theodore Vail was president of AT&T & a number of other beautiful Victorian-era houses & churches. Those who want to leave before going to Morristown's Historic District, the train leaves Morristown 5:23 PM, arriving back in NYC at 6:39 PM. Those who want to stay & walk around Morristown's Historic District, the train leaves Morristown 6;23 PM, arriving back in NYC 7:39 PM. Article from The New York Times about Morristown https://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/10/realestate/morristown-nj-historic-with-a-lively-downtown.html 2-minute video of frelinghuysen Arboretum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eSAOxvnoAGA Meeting Time: (before lunch) 12:45 PM. Bring lunch. (There will be limited places to buy lunch along the way.) Meeting Place: Outside of entrance to Staples at 30 Lafayette Avenue Before the walk, restrooms are in Staples. Staples is across the street from the train's back parking lot between Lackawanna Place & Lafayette Avenue. Public Transportation from NYC to Morristown NJ Transit section of NYC Penn Station, take 11:11 AM Morris & Essex Line New Jersey Transit Train from NYC to Morristown, NJ, arriving 12:28 PM. Before boarding train, buy ticket at NJ Transit ticket window/ vending machine. Get ticket from NYC to Morristown, NJ (Reg. fare $14.00 one way; senior fare/disabilities [62 years & Up] $6.25 one way; You can buy two tickets (one from NYC Penn Station to Morristown & one from Morristown back to NYC Penn Station). Buying reg. fare ticket on the train is more expensive ($5 surcharge). However, seniors citizens [62 years & up]/disabilities who show the proper ID may buy ticket on train w/o paying $5. ALLOW EXTRA TIME TO BUY TICKETS AT NYC PENN STATION Public Transportation from NJ to Morristown Board the Morris & Essex Line train in Secaucus Junction at 11:20 AM Morris & Essex Line schedule https://www.njtransit.com/pdf/rail/R0040.pdf DRIVING DIRECTIONS You can park your car for the entire walk in the westbound side parking lot of the Morristown train station. This parking lot is at the back of the station between Lafayette Avenue & Lackawanna Place. The daily parking fee is $5. After parking, walk across the street to the small shopping mall & wait in front of Staples. Information about the Morristown Parking Authority (Monday to Friday between 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM) at[masked] to make sure that the parking is $5 on Saturday at this train station. Bad weather cancels walk. Therefore, if it is bad weather, I'll send email about cancellation before 8:30 AM on Saturday morning. If I don't send out email about cancellation, I plan to be at meeting place.

Source: https://www.meetup.com/fr-FR/NYC-and-NJ-Walks-Explore-Architecture-Art-History-Sculpture/events/255675194/


Staples in Morristown
Morristown
États-Unis

Art Culture
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