Presidents' Day: Historic Harlem Walk

Event unavailable.

Selon le cas, de nouvelles dates appraîtront bientôt ou l'activité proposée sera définitivement supprimée.

Mon 19 February à 19:30/strike>

Outside the entrance to the Schomburg Library
New York
États-Unis

This Harlem walk is along a very scenic route filled with interesting places. I will comment on some things (the architecture and social history of some of the buildings) along the way, but you will have plenty of time to socialize with others. WE WILL STOP AT A NUMBER OF POINTS OF INTEREST. (THIS IS SIMILAR TO A GUIDED WALKING TOUR.)

Cost: The cost of this event is $3 per person, which is paid at the start of the walk. This is for the organizer's Meetup preparation costs and fees. (Please read the "About Us Section" for more information regarding the $3 per person fee for each event.)


IF YOU DON'T LIKE TO STOP AT A NUMBER OF POINTS OF INTEREST (THIS IS SIMILAR TO A GUIDED WALKING TOUR), THEN THIS WALK IS NOT GOOD FOR YOU. THIS WALK IS ABOUT 2 1/2 MILES AND MODERATE PACED. 

If you are registered for this walk and can't attend, please change your RSVP online from "YES" to "NO".  (PLEASE READ THE "ABOUT US SECTION" FOR THE GUIDELINES REGARDING THE NO SHOW POLICY.)


THERE IS NO NEED TO POST WHY YOU CAN'T MAKE THE EVENT. 

BRING COMFORTABLE WALKING SHOES, WATER AND EXTRA LAYERS OF CLOTHING. 


No young children or pets allowed on this walk without the prior approval of the organizer. No smoking, please. Thank you for your cooperation. 

If you have a personal matter or questions for me, please contact me directly through my private Meetup account. The organizer for this Meetup event is John, the event host. This is intended to help reduce the number of unwanted emails from being sent out to everyone. 

Description: 

Harlem has been home to many races as well as ethnic groups and we'll talk about some of the people who had lived in this neighborhood over the years. We'll walk through three lovely historic districts, and pass by back alley streets, elegant townhouses, southern-style porches, fashionable brownstone fronts, and even a polychrome church facade. We’ll also look at extant buildings that once housed a night club, photography studio, social clubs, synagogues, etc.  We discuss people who "left their mark" for good or bad in Harlem and beyond.

We will stop for restrooms during the middle of the walk.

Meeting Time: The meeting time is (after lunch) at 1:30 PM. 


Meeting Place: The meeting place is outside the entrance to the Schomburg Library Center at 515 Malcolm X Boulevard/Lenox Avenue and West 135th Street. Before the walk, restrooms are available in the Harlem Hospital, which is directly across the street from the Schomburg Library Center.


Public Transportation: Take the 2 or 3 subway trains to Malcolm X Boulevard (Lenox Avenue) and West 135th Street. According to the MTA website, the 2 or 3 subways trains is stopping at Lenox Avenue and West 135th Street.

Finishing Time:  This walk finishes about 4:45 PM. 

Finishing Place: This walk ends at Malcolm X Boulevard (Lenox Avenue) and West 120th Street, not far from the No. 2 or 3 subway line.

Rainy or snowy weather or other bad weather conditions (very cold or cold and windy conditions) will cancel this walk. Therefore, if the forecast is for rainy or snowy weather or other bad weather conditions (very cold or cold and windy conditions), I will send out emails about the cancellation sometime before 10:30 AM on Monday morning.  If I don't send out emails about the cancellation, I plan to be at the meeting place. 

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Photo of bicycle riders near Mount Morris Park (now Marcus Garvey Park) in Harlem. The use of bicycles for recreation and exercise increased in the late 19th century.(Source MCNY [Byron and Company, 1896])

Photo of a policeman directing traffic outside the Regents Theatre (now the First Corinthian Baptist Church) in Harlem. The Regents Theatre was built in 1913 at a time when the motion picture business was transiting from showing short films in nickelodeons to offering photoplays in larger theaters. (Source MCNY [Byron and Company, 1915])

Photo of dancers at a Harlem jazz nightclub doing the jitterbug. Although he didn't coin the word, the jitterbug dance is attributed to Cab Calloway of Harlem and his song “Call the Jitter Bug” produced in 1934, and the film “Jitterbug Party”, both of which were responsible for popularizing the word.(Source MCNY [Sid Grossman-Federal Arts Project, 1939])


Photo of children following baseball pitcher Satchel Page down a Harlem street. Satchel Page played until age 47 and was inducted in the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971. (Source Life Magazine, 1941)

Photo of children (members of the Tin Club of America under the guidance of NYC Salvage Committee) who collected 500 pounds of tin cans in one day for the war (World War II) effort. (Source Library of Congress [Office of War Information, August, 1942])

Photo of boxer Sugar Ray Robinson standing next to his flamingo-pink Cadillac outside his nightclub in Harlem. From the mid-1940s to early 1960s, Sugar Ray Robinson opened several storefront businesses on Adam Clayton Powell Blvd in Harlem. In 2012, this stretch was renamed "Sugar Ray Robinson Way." (Photo Life Magazine)

Photo of Brooke Astor talking to children at Harlem's 130th Street, which she helped redevelop with her donations. (Source The New York Times [James Estrin, 1997])


 

 

 

 


Source: https://www.meetup.com/fr-FR/NYC-and-NJ-Walks-Explore-Architecture-Art-History-Sculpture/events/247650120/